User Manual

Please note that some minor aspects of this user manual may not be fully up-to-date. This guide will be updated as time permits.

Stutsmanvill Repeater Complex – User’s Manual





 


Table of Contents




 



System Overview


The W8GQN/N8DNX/KO8P Repeater system, located on a hill just west of Stutsmanville Michigan, consists of the
Straits Area Amateur Radio Club (SAARC) VHF repeater and the N8DNX/KO8P privately owned UHF repeaters and
remote base. Both systems cover much of the Northern part of the Lower Peninsula, and Eastern part of
the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. These systems share a common controller, power systems and ancillary equipment.
























































 

W8GQN Repeater

Output Frequency: 146.680 MHz
Input Frequency: 146.080 MHz
Offset: -600 KHz
PL Frequency: 110.9 Hz (normally required)
Repeater: GE Receiver

Quintron Transmitter
Final Power: 100W
Duplexer: 6 Can Custom

1.5 db loss (aprox)
Transmission Line: 450′ 7/8″ Heliax

1.98 db loss (.44 db/ft)
Line sharing: TX/RX Crossband Couplers (for sharing line with UHF Rptr)

.15 db loss each – total .3 db
Antenna: Sinclair 4 Bay Dipole?

6 db gain
Power to Antenna: 41.9 W
ERP: 166.7 W
Height on Tower: 405′
HAAT: 784′
Height above Sea Level: 1655′
 

N8DNX Repeater

Output Frequency: 442.375 MHz
Input Frequency: 447.375 Mhz
Offset: +5.00 MHz
PL Frequency: 107.2 Hz (normally not required)
Repeater: Vertex VXR-5000
Amplifier: TPL
Final Power: 250W
Duplexer: (none)
Transmission Line: Transmit – 450′ 7/8″ Heliax (shared with W8GQN repeater)

Receive – 550′ LMR-400
Tranmission Line Loss: Transmit – 3.7 db

Receive – 14.85 (overcome by preamp gain)
Line Sharing: TX/RX Crossband Couplers (for sharing line with VHF Rptr)

.15 db loss each – total .3 db
Antenna: Transmit – Sinclair 8 Bay Dipole

Receive – Sinclair 8 Bay Dipole
Power to Antenna: 55.9 W
ERP: 444.2 W
Height on Tower: Transmit 405′, Receive 477′
HAAT: Transmit 784′, Receive 856′
Height above Sea Level: Transmit 1655′, Receive 1727′
Preamp: Angle Linear High Level Preamp – Gain ~ 20db (mounted at antenna)
 

KO8P Repeater

Output Frequency: 443.375 MHz
Input Frequency: 448.375 MHz
Offset: +5.00 MHz
PL Frequency: 107.2 Hz (normally not required)
Repeater: Vertex VXR-5000
Final Power: 25W
Power to Antenna: 7.5 W
ERP: 59.5 W
(all other stats same as N8DNX Repeater)
 

Remote Base

HF Radio: Kenwood TS-450S

Transmit: 160-10 Meter Ham Bands

Receive: .1 – 30 MHz continuous
HF Antenna: Hy-Gain 18HT vertical, currently with 17M kit and 30 60′ radials
VHF/UHF Radio: Yaesu FT-736

Transmit & Receive: 50, 144, 220, & 440 MHz All Modes
VHF/UHF Antennas: Single 6 Meter folded dipole and Diamond X3200A for 144, 220, & 440 MHz
 

Controller

Model: Link Communications RLC-3
Radio Cards: 8
Audio Delay: Aprox. 200 ms on W8GQN and N8DNX repeaters
Digital Voice Recorder: DVR-1 with 16 MB memory – 35 Min. total record time
 

Power

Primary Power: 110v AC
Backup Power: Heart Interface 1KW Power Inverter
Batteries: 4 200 AH Sealed


All systems are open for general use. A PL tone of 110.9 Hz is generally required on the W8GQN VHF repeater
to avoid interference with another nearby repeater. There is, however, a bypass code (*00) that will
temporarily remove the PL tone requirement and permit access by users who don’t have PL tone capability.
Users are encouraged to use this code and distribute it freely.


Many features of these repeaters are available for use by anyone within range of the repeater and there is
on-line help available to assist users with those features. Other features are available only to registered users.
Registration is not intended to restrict use of those features, but rather to enable use of those features.
Registered users are encouraged to demonstrate those features for others and may activate and operate them
for non-registered and transient users.


The system has been designed and programmed to be as easy to use as possible. It is, however, still a
work-in-progress and users are encouraged to ask questions and suggest changes and improvements. Questions and
suggestions should be submitted to Chuck Scott N8DNX via E-Mail at info@n8dnx.org.



Repeater Operation and Etiquette



Users should keep in mind the following items when using these repeaters.



  • Keep transmissions relatively short. The repeater will timeout after 3 minutes.

  • Wait for the “courtesy beep” before starting your transmission.

  • Users who want to break into a conversation should simply say “Break” prior to the courtesy beep.

  • Users who want to break into a conversation with priority or emergency traffic should say
    “Break, Break, Break” prior to the courtesy beep, then wait to make sure their priority transmission
    doesn’t “double” with another users transmission.

  • Emergency and health and welfare traffic always have priority over other communications.

  • It is common courtesy to permit other users to join a conversation.

  • It is impolite to break into an ongoing conversation for the purpose of initiating a separate conversation with another station.

  • It is impolite (and frankly illegal) to “kerchunk” (key up) the repeater without ID’ing.

  • Users should not acknowledge, intimidate or otherwise argue with any user who intentionally interferes
    with or attempts to disrupt repeater operations. Please report all such offenses to a system operator
    or club officer via telephone or on another frequency.

  • Always be polite, courteous and helpful to all other users of the repeater.




Registered User Security



Registered users are issued a “User Number” and a “Pass Code”. Your user number is public information. It
enables other users to send you private voice mail over the repeater. Your pass code is not public information
and you should not share it with other users of the repeater. If you believe that someone else has decoded your
pass code and may be using it, the system operator can issue you a more secure type of pass code that can’t be
determined by monitoring your transmissions on the input frequency.



On-Line Help System



The repeater system has an “on-line” help system that lists many of the more common commands user may need.
The help system is divided into a number of sections including system description and general help, and individual
descriptions for each logical group of commands. User may enter “999” to access the main system information and help
overview message. All system information and help messages are “polite announcements” in that they stop when the
repeater receives a transmission. This permits a user to stop the transmission as soon as they’ve heard the information
of interest by briefly keying their transmitter.



User Command Descriptions



All user commands are entered using the numeric keypad on your radio while you’re transmitting into the repeater. Not
all commands are can be used by all users. The “User Level Required” field in the command descriptions below indicates
the user level required to execute each command.


Before you can execute any command that requires user level 1 or higher, you must first log into the repeater using
your user number and pass code (see command 71). You do not need to log into the repeater to use any level 0 command.


Each registered user is assigned a “User Level”. The user level you are assigned depends on whether or not you are a
Remote Base user or if you are a control or system operator. If you are a Remote Base user, your user level is
determined by the class of your Ham Radio license.












User Level Description
0 All users, no user registration or user number/pass code are required.
1 Registered user
2 Technician Class Remote Base users
3 General Class Remote Base users
4 Advanced Class Remote Base users
5 Extra Class Remote Base users
6 Control Operators
7 System programming


The curly braces “{” and “}” in a Command Code indicate that the user is to include other variable digits along
with the command. For example, the command …


* {PhoneNumber}


…indicates that the user should press “*” followed by the desired phone number.


Entering an incorrect command code, attempting to enter a command from a repeater port on which the command is
not available, or entering a command you are not authorized to use, may result in either no response from the
repeater or an error message. While some error messages are given by voice announcement, most error messages are
given by number. The following table lists possible numeric error messages and their meaning.
















Error Number Description
Error 200 Command not found
Error 201 Too few data digits entered
Error 202 Too many data digits entered
Error 203 ncorrect number of digits entered
Error 204 Command not allowed from this repeater input
Error 205 You do not have permission to use this command
Error 210 Incorrect digits entered for this command
Error 212 Bad Autopatch Number
Error 213 General Autopatch error
Error 214 User log-in is disabled
Error 215 Digital Voice Recorder is busy
Error 217 Bad command entered in Remote Base mode





















































































































































































































































 

System Information and Help Messages 

Command: Announce system description and help system overview
Command Code: 999
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
Main system description and help system overview voice announcement. This is a “polite” command.


Additional help announcements are available using the following codes.



29 Voice mail and bulletin announcement commands
39 Intra-System linking commands
49 Inter-System linking commands
59 Remote Base commands
69 Weather Radio commands
79 User Access commands
89 Test commands
99 System Status commands

 


 

PL Access Commands 

Command: Bypass PL Decode requirement on VHF repeater for 15 minutes
Codes to execute: *00
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
This command turns off the PL tone access requirement for the VHF repeater and
permits access by stations that can’t transmit the 110.9 Hz PL tone normally required
to access the VHF repeater. After 15 minutes, PL access is automatically reinstated.
You do not need to transmit the 110.9 Hz PL tone to enter this command, thus stations
without PL can issue this command and access the repeater without assistance.

 


 

Voice Mail and Bulletin Commands 

Command: Check for public voice mail
Codes to execute: 20
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
Instructs the repeater to announce if there are any public voice mail messages available
to be read. If there are, the repeater will announce who those messages are for. If
there is more than one message, the sequence the repeater announces who they are for will
determine the number you will need to use to play a particular message using command code 21.
After listening to your message, you can delete that message using command code 22.


For example…


  • You enter command code 20
  • The repeater responds with “There is mail for, N8DNX, N8JBO”
  • Since it announced N8JBO second, you use command code “21 2” to listen to the message.
  • You then enter command code “22” to erase the message you just heard.

Since the public voice mail commands do not require a user level above 0,
they can be used by any repeater user without any need to be “registered” or to log into the repeater.

 

Command: Retrieve a Publc mail message
Codes to execute: 21 {MessageNumber}
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
Use this command to play a particular public mail message.


See command code 20 for an example of using this command.

 

Command: Erase a Public mail message
Codes to execute: 22
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
Erase the public mail message that has just been played. For this command to work,
you must enter it immediately after listening to the message using command code 21.


See command code 20 for an example of using this command.

 

Command: Record a Public mail message
Codes to execute: 23
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
Record a public mail message for another repeater user. After you enter this command,
the repeater will ask you who the message is for and then to record your message.


For example…


  • You enter command 23
  • The repeater says “Who is your message for?”
  • You key your transmitter and say only “N8JBO”
  • The repeater comes back and says “Please record your message.”
  • You key your transmitter and state your message for the other repeater user.
  • The repeater comes back and says “Your message is stored.”

Note: There is a limited amount of time available for all recorded messages in
the repeater. Please keep your message short.

 

Command: Play Private Mail Messages
Codes to execute: 24 {User #}
User Level Required: 1 – Registered users
Description:
Use this command code to play any private mail that has been left for you. Don’t forget
to include your user number after the command code 24. Your user number is the three digit
number you used to log into the system.

 

Command: Erase Private Mail Messages
Codes to execute: 25
User Level Required: 1 – Registered users
Description:
Use this command code after listening to your private voice mail to erase it.

 

Command: Record a Private Voice Mail Message
Codes to execute: 26 {User #}
User Level Required: 1 – Registered users
Description:
Use this command code to record private voice mail for another user. Using this command
is similar to command code 23. Enter command code 26 followed by the user number of the
user for whom you wish to leave voice mail, wait for a courtesy tone, then key up and say your message.

 

Command: Play any available SAARC club bulletins
Codes to execute: 27
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
Use this command code to play a recorded SAARC club bulletin. The W8GQN VHF repeater will
announce when such bulletins are available.

 

Command: Play any available N8DNX repeater bulletin
Codes to execute: 28
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
Use this command code to play a recorded N8DNX repeater bulletin. The N8DNX UHF repeater
will announce when such bulletins are available.

 

Command: On-Line help for Voice Mail and Bulletin commands
Codes to execute: 29
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
This command plays a brief polite voice message describing Voice Mail and Bulletin commands.

 


 

Intra-System Linking Commands 

Command: Turn off current link
Codes to execute: 30
User Level Required: 0 – All Users (set to permit turning links off after login timeout)
Description:
This command code will turn off linking initiated using command codes 31 through 36.


Complex Intra-System Linking


An interesting aspect of the Intra-System linking commands is that they are “cumulative”. In
other words, you can choose to monitor or link to more than one other part of the system at the
same time from the repeater you’re currently using. Also, command code 30 will turn off any and
all linking to other parts of the system from the current repeater. As a result, an advanced user
can link several parts of the system together at one time. (Note that the tail message will only
repeat the last link established.)


One curious thing is that linking to one part of the system that is linked to another part does
not mean that all 3 parts are linked together. For example, if the N8DNX repeater is currently
linked to KO8P and you, as a user of the VHF repeater, link the W8GQN repeater to the N8DNX repeater,
you will not be linked to the KO8P repeater. In essence, you could talk to people on the N8DNX repeater and people on the N8DNX
could talk to people on the KO8P repeater, but you couldn’t talk to people on the KO8P repeater.


Assuming the situation where you wanted the W8GQN and N8DNX repeaters linked together and both
of them also linked to KO8P, how would you do this?


  1. Enter 32 from the W8GQN repeater to link to N8DNX
  2. Enter 36 from the W8GQN repeater to link to KO8P
  3. Enter 36 from the N8DNX repeater to link to KO8P

To drop all of the links simply enter 30 from both the W8GQN and N8DNX repeaters. Note that
entering 30 on the N8DNX repeater will drop the links to both KO8P and the W8GQN repeater at the same time.

 

Command: Monitor W8GQN VHF repeater from current repeater
Codes to execute: 31
User Level Required: 1 – Login Required
Description:
Entering this command code will cause any transmissions received by the on the W8GQN VHF
repeater to be transmitted on the repeater you are currently using. The W8GQN repeater will
not transmit any transmissions received on the repeater you are currently using. Use this command
to monitor activity on the W8GQN repeater without interfering with a conversation on that repeater.
An occasional tail message will indicate that this is active.


Note: This command is makes no sense for, and is not available from the W8GQN repeater.


Use command code 32 to establish a two-way link to the VHF repeater.

 

Command: Link to the VHF W8GQN repeater from the current repeater
Codes to execute: 32
User Level Required: 1 – Login Required
Description:
Entering this command code establishes a two-way link to the W8GQN repeater. Use this command
to effectively link both repeaters together so that users of both the W8GQN VHF repeater and
the repeater your are currently using can engage in a conversation together. An occasional tail
message will indicate that this is active.


Note: This command is makes no sense for, and is not available from the W8GQN repeater.


Use command code 31 to monitor the W8GQN repeater’s activity before using this command.

 

Command: Monitor N8DNX (442.375) from current repeater
Codes to execute: 33
User Level Required: 1 – Login Required
Description:
Entering this command code will cause any transmissions received by the on the N8DNX repeater
to be transmitted on the repeater you are currently using. The N8DNX repeater will not
transmit any transmissions received on the repeater you are currently using. Use this command
to monitor activity on the N8DNX repeater without interfering with a conversation on that
repeater. An occasional tail message will indicate that this is active.


Note: This command is makes no sense for, and is not available from the N8DNX repeater.


Use command code 34 to establish a two-way link to the N8DNX repeater.

 

Command: Link to the N8DNX repeater (442.375) from the current repeater
Codes to execute: 34
User Level Required: 1 – Login Required
Description:
Entering this command code establishes a two-way link to the N8DNX repeater. Use this
command to effectively link both repeaters together so that users of both the N8DNX repeater
and the repeater your are currently using can engage in a conversation together. An occasional
tail message will indicate that this is active.
Note: This command is makes no sense for, and is not available from the N8DNX repeater.


Use command code 33 to monitor the N8DNX repeater activity before using this command.

 

Command: Monitor KO8P reater (443.375) from current repeater
Codes to execute: 35
User Level Required: 1 – Login Required
Description:
Entering this command code will cause any transmissions received by the on the KO8P repeater
to be transmitted on the repeater you are currently using. The KO8P repeater will not
transmit any transmissions received on the repeater you are currently using. Use this command
to monitor activity on the KO8P repeater without interfering with a conversation on that
repeater. An occasional tail message will indicate that this is active.


Note: This command is makes no sense for, and is not available from the KO8P repeater.


Use command code 36 to establish a two-way link to the KO8P repeater.

 

Command: Link to the KO8P repeater from the current repeater
Codes to execute: 36
User Level Required: 1 – Login Required
Description:
Entering this command code establishes a two-way link to the KO8P repeater. Use this
command to effectively link both repeaters together so that users of both the KO8P repeater
and the repeater your are currently using can engage in a conversation together. An occasional
tail message will indicate that this is active.


Note: This command is makes no sense for, and is not available from the KO8P repeater.


Use command code 35 to monitor the KO8P repeater activity before using this command.

 

Command: Send Command to IRLP
Codes to execute: 38 {Node#}

38 73

38 {Command}
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
This command is unusual in that it has several uses. Since you can’t send
commands to the node computer without first linking to it, and since once you’ve linked to the
node computer there’s no sense in linking to it again, there is no practical confusion between
these two uses. An occasional tail message will indicate that this is active (sends “I T” in
morse code for “IRLP Transmit”).


Use 1: Connect to another IRLP node


Enter this command followed by a 4 digit command to the IRLP node computer to control the
IRLP system. (Note that all IRLP node numbers are now 4 digits. Use the “38 73” command to
disconnect from any IRLP node.)


38 4460 – Connect to the Southfield node
38 73 – Disconnect from the Southfield node

Use “38 73” to disconnect from a node (see below).


Note: Access to the IRLP node is now allowed by all users-login is no longer required.


Use 2: Disconnect from any currently connected IRLP node


Simply enter “38 73” to disconnect from any IRLP node. (73…get it?)


Use 3: Special IRLP Node Commands


Below are some special commands available using the IRLP node computer. These do not connect
to other IRLP nodes. Instead the perform functions local to the IRLP computer, such as playing
an ARRL News recording.


38 73 – Disconnect from any IRLP node or stop playing messages listed below
38 0001 – Play most recent ARRL News
38 0002 – Play most recent Amateur Radio Newsline
38 0003 – Play This Week in Amateur Radio
38 0101 – Play Pelston Airport Weather (updated hourly)
38 0102 – Play stats from most receint IRLP connection
38 0103 – Play current propagation report
38 0113 – Play Solar X-Ray flux report for GEOS satellites
38 0104 – Play list of nearby APRS stations
38 0105 – Play status of 5.8 GHz wireless network feed
38 0199 – Play a silly message

 

Command: On-Line help for Intra-System Linking commands
Codes to execute: 39
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
This command plays a brief polite voice message describing Intra-System Linking commands.

 


 

Preset Remote Base Linking Commands 

Command: Turn off link to remote base
Codes to execute: 40
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
This command is used to disconnect from a preset remote base link.


Preset links are those for which the operating parameters (such as frequency, mode, offset, and
PL), are predefined. Preset remote base links permit quick access to those frequencies without
having to go through the process of setting all necessary parameters. A list of these presets
is included below. (See commands starting at 400.)

 

Command: Toggle preset remote base link between Receive and Transmit/Receive
Codes to execute: 41
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
Use this command to switch from receive-only mode to transmit and receive mode while using
one of the preset remote base links.


The default mode when you first enable a preset remote base link is receive only. You will need to
use this command before you can talk to another station using the remote base preset.


Always listen on the remote base before selecting transmit/receive mode. If you are experiencing
interference on the local repeater, disconnect from the remote base to avoid causing interference
to stations on the frequency to which the remote base is tuned.

 

Command: Preset Remote Base Links
Codes to execute: 400 through 499
User Level Required: 1 – Login Required
Description:
The following is a list of preset remote base configuration commands. Enter one of these
commands to configure the remote base to the listed frequency and mode and to monitor traffic
on that frequency. Use command code 41 to switch to transmit/receive mode after first monitoring
the selected frequency.


Note: Transmitting on the remote base is, in general, restricted to users who are
licensed for the remote base frequency being used.


Command Preset Configuration


400 – 146.740 Repeater (Cheboygan)
410 – 29.6 FM Simplex
450 – WWV on 10 MHz

 

Command: On-Line help for Preset Remote Base Linking Commands
Codes to execute: 49
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
This command plays a brief polite voice message describing Preset Remote Base Linking Commands.

 


 

General Remote Base Operation 

Command: Turn on the Remote Base system
Codes to execute: 50
User Level Required: 2 through 5 (depending on class of license)
Description:
This command turns on the remote base system. A full explanation of the remote base system and
its operation is included in a separate document titled “Remote Base Operation Manual” (issued
to authorized users at the time they sign up for use of the remote base).


You must use this command to turn on the remote base before entering any remote base commands.
Once the remote base has been turned on, you will only be able to use the remote base commands
and will have to turn off the remote base system before running any normal repeater commands.

 

Command: On-Line help for enabling the Remote Base
Codes to execute: 59
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
This command plays a brief polite voice message describing enabling the Remote Base system.
No on-line help is available for operation of the remote base. Please be sure to carry with you
at least the “Short Form Remote Base Operation Guide” when operating the remote base.

 


 

Weather Alert and Monitoring Commands 

Command: Monitor Weather Receiver for 2 Minutes
Codes to execute: 60
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
This command plays the weather receiver over the current repeater for up to 2 minutes. The
weather receiver is pre-tuned to a local NOAA weather transmitter and will automatically switch
to a backup channel should the local weather transmitter fail.

 

Command: Turn off Weather Receiver
Codes to execute: 61
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
Use this command to stop monitoring the weather receiver. You may use this command if you
don’t want to wait for the entire 2 minutes provided by command code 60.


Note: Do not use this command to interrupt an automatically triggered weather alert transmission.

 

Command: Replay last weather alert message
Codes to execute: 62
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
This command replays the last automatically transmitted weather alert message.


Each time a weather alert is broadcast by the local NOAA weather station, the repeater will play the
message live on both the W8GQN and N8DNX repeaters while recording the message for replay. If a
weather alert has been triggered, the repeater will announce this by periodically stating “Weather
Alert”. Use this command to listen to the most recent message.


Note: Only control operators can clear a weather alert message and discontinue the alert announcements.


The weather receiver is only triggered by significant local weather broadcasts from NOAA that will
affect Emmet and surrounding counties and is not triggered by test messages.

 

Command: On-Line help for Weather Alert and Monitoring Commands
Codes to execute: 69
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
This command plays a brief polite voice message describing the weather alert system and
monitoring of NOAA weather broadcasts.

 


 

Security and Access Commands 

Command: List Users Who are Currently Logged In
Codes to execute: 70
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
This command will list any users who used command code 71 and are currently logged in (have
a user level greater than 0). Logging into the system permits a user to use restricted
commands (commands which require a user level greater than 0). A user will remain “logged in”
as long as they keep entering commands. If a logged-in user doesn’t enter a command for some
period of time, the system will automatically log that user out of the system and return them
to user level 0.

 

Command: Log Into the System
Codes to execute: 71 {user ID}

71 {user ID} {Pass Code}
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
Use this command to log into the repeater system and permit access to commands that require
a user level greater than 0.


Note: The system will log you out automatically if you do not enter any command codes
for a few minutes. When this happens, you will hear the message “{your call} Control Down”.


WARNING: Any user on the repeater you used to log-into the system may issue restricted
commands permitted to your user level while you are logged in. In essence, once you log in,
the system can’t tell if someone sending it command codes is the one who logged-in or someone
else. You are responsible for the use of your user ID. Be sure to log out using command code
72 as soon as you are done.


WARNING: You are responsible for the use of your user ID. Do not share your Pass Code
or Pass Phrase with others. If you believe for some reason that your ID and Pass Code or Pass
Phrase is being used by someone else, contact a control or system operator immediately and
have them disable your ID or issue you new access codes.


A user with a specific user level may use any commands available to that user level and all
commands available to lower user levels. For example, a General class remote base user can use
any command available to Tech class remote base users, club members or any user who has not
logged-in, but not those available only to level 4 (Advanced) and greater.












IDLevelUser Type
(none)0Any repeater user
100-1991Club members without access to the Remote Base System
200-2992Remote Base users with a Tech class license
300-3993Remote Base users with a General class license
400-4994Remote Base users with an Advanced class license
500-5995Remote Base users with an Extra class license
600-6996Repeater Control operators and Officers
700-9997System operators and programmers


Note: The remote base system knows on which frequencies each class of licensee is permitted
to transmit. Operators need not worry about transmitting outside frequencies permitted for their
license class-the system will not let them do so. This is the only reason for separating access
levels by license class.


There are two forms of this command. Which one you use will depend on whether you have been
assigned a “Pass Code” or a “Pass Phrase”. A “Pass Code” is a specific sequence of from 3 to
5 digits that you will always enter exactly. A “Pass Phrase” is a longer sequence of up to 8
digits that provide a “cross reference” of sorts and is used as part of a “challenge/response”
process. The practical difference is that someone monitoring the input channel with a Touch
Tone decoder can decode your “Pass Code” and use your ID, while the proper use of “Pass Phrase”
makes it very difficult for someone monitoring with a decoder to correctly determine your entire
Pass Phrase and thus to use your ID.


Note: Use of a “Pass Phrase” is beyond the scope of this manual and will be explained to
users who for some reason require higher security.


Most users will be assigned a Pass Code and will log-in the same way each time. For example,
a user with the ID 167 and a Pass Code of 526 would log into the system as follows:


71 167 526

 

Command: Log Out of the System
Codes to execute: 72
User Level Required: 1 – All Logged-In Users
Description:
Use this command to log out of the system and return to user level 0. You are required to use
this command when you are done entering restricted commands to prevent other unprivileged users
from entering restricted commands.

 

Command: On-Line help for Security and Access Commands
Codes to execute: 79
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
This command plays a brief polite voice message describing the Security and Access command codes.

 


 

Test and Diagnostic Commands 

Command: Touch Tone Pad Test
Codes to execute: 80 {digits}
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
Use this command to test the Touch Tone pad on your radio. Any digits included after command code
80 will be repeated by the system in the order in which they were entered. Do not un-key between
the command code and the digits you want to test.


Use may use this command to test all keys on your Touch Tone pad, including A, B, C, D, * and #.


Note: If the system doesn’t properly reply, you may not be strong enough into the repeater
to reliably enter codes or may have some problem with your radio. The most common problems other
than a weak signal are under or over deviation and “twist”. Twist is a situation where there is
a significant difference in level between the low tones and high tones that are produced as you
press each key.


You can use this command to determine if you have a good enough signal prior to executing other commands.

 

Command: Test Received Audio
Codes to execute: 81
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
Using this command you can hear a short recording of your signal as the repeater received it to evaluate
how well you’re being heard by the repeater. This can be helpful to ensure that your signal is adequate
for a reliable autopatch or to help evaluate issues with your signal.

  1. Key your transmitter and enter command code 81
  2. Unkey your transmitter and wait for the courtesy beep
  3. Key your transmitter and make a short transmission
  4. Unkey your transmitter

The system will then replay a recording of your last transmission.

 

Command: Report Your Signal Level on one of the UHF Repeaters
Codes to execute: 82
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
This command reports the average of your signal level over the last several seconds of your
transmission and the high (maximum) value during your entire transmission. The command only
functions on the N8DNX and KO8P repeaters.


At this point a short description of the UHF receiver systems is in order to help you understand
the signal levels reported by this command code. Briefly, both UHF repeaters use the same antenna,
preamplifier, transmission line and distribution amplifier. The following table lists, in order,
various parts of the receive system with gains and losses.














Antenna +9 db
Preamp Front-end Filter -.4 db
Preamp +20 db (noise figure aprox .5 db)
Protector, DC pickoff -.3 db
Transmission line -14.9 db
Protector -.3 db
DC Power Injector -.3 db
Distribution Amplifier +12 db
Signal Splitter -3 db
 
Net gain after front-end filter+13.2 db


Since there is adequate gain in the system to overcome any loss after the preamplifier, the
system noise figure (sensitivity) is effectively set at the preamplifier. The signal delivered to
the receiver, where the signal level is measured, has a net gain of +13.2 db over the level of
signals at the input to the preamplifier. As a result, the reported signal levels may seem a bit
higher than you would normally expect for the quality of signal received since I did not compensate
for this when I calibrated it. (Perhaps I will some time in the future.)


The following table can be used to convert the dbm readings to uv (microvolts) at the receiver and
preamplifier inputs, and to gain an understanding of what these numbers mean in practical terms.











dbmAt receiverAt preampComment
-113 .5 uv .1 uv Lowest possible reading
-110 .7 uv .15 uv Weak signal, copyable
-100 2.2 uv .48 uv Some noise, good signal
-90 7.1 uv 1.5 uv Little noise, solid signal
-80 22 uv 4.8 uv Near full quieting
-70 71 uv 15 uv Excellent signal
-66 112 uv 25 uv Highest possible reading


Note: Due to limitations in the signal level reporting of the repeater, -113 is the weakest
reading, and -66 is the strongest reading that can be reported. Signals stronger than -66 dbm will
still read approximately that value. Also, due to a slight increase in loss at the front-end filter
on the input frequency of the KO8P repeater, readings on that repeater will be slightly worse than the N8DNX repeater.

 

Command: On-Line help for Test and Diagnostic Commands
Codes to execute: 89
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
This command plays a brief polite voice message describing the test and diagnostic command codes.

 


 

System Status Commands 

Command: System Status Summary
Codes to execute: 90
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
Use this command to produce a report of all system status values. The values reported are:

Date and time
Backup battery current
Backup battery voltage
DC Supply voltage
UHF #1 (N8DNX) “Squelch Low” status
UHF preamp current

For an explanation of these values see the appropriate individual command below.

 

Command: Backup Battery Current
Codes to execute: 91
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
Report the present averaged value of current through the backup battery bank. This command
reports the “absolute value” of the battery current (only the amount of current, not
whether it’s into or out of the batteries).


Normally, the battery backup system charges the backup batteries as they are being used.
The amount of current being reported is actually the net current between the charge and
load currents. During a power failure, you are likely to see current values up to, or
exceeding, 100 amps. Also, since the N8DNX power amplifier is tied directly to the backup
batteries, you may see values exceeding 50 amps at times when AC power is present.


Note: At this time there is a problem with obtaining a reliable value of current from
the backup battery current shunt amplifier. Values may not be correct or even close.
(I hope to fix that sometime next spring.)

 

Command: Backup Battery Voltage
Codes to execute: 92
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
This command reports the voltage present on the backup batteries. When AC power is present,
a voltage or 13 volts or greater is normal. Lower voltages indicate that there is currently
an AC power failure, or the has been and the batteries are still being charged.


Note: When the backup battery voltage is less than 12.8 volts, but greater than 11.5
volts, the repeater courtesy beeps on the W8GQN and N8DNX repeaters will change to a CW “B”.
This indicates that the system is on, or recovering from an AC power failure. A CW “BL”
indicates that the battery voltage is less than 11.5 volts (battery low). The power inverter
will automatically shut off, and the repeaters will cease to function, when the voltage reaches
about 10.5 volts. This is necessary to protect the batteries.

 

Command: DC Supply Voltage
Codes to execute: 93
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
This command reports the voltage present at the DC input of the RLC-3 repeater controller
and roughly represents the voltage of the DC power supply used to power the controller and
various other devices in the repeater system. This value should always be roughly 13.8 volts.


Note: The DC power supply is used to power devices that require 12V DC, but that
won’t operate properly with the reduced or varying voltage available on the backup batteries.
During an AC power failure, the backup system will automatically switch in and produce AC power
from a 1 KW power inverter to all devices that require AC power, including the DC power supply.
This permits these devices to continue operate during an AC power failure as they normally would
when AC is present.

 

Command: Date and Time
Codes to execute: 94
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
Report the current Date and Time as known by the internal clock in the repeater controller.

 

Command: Room Temperature
Codes to execute: 95
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
This command reports the temperature inside the repeater room. During the winter, the repeater
room is normally kept warm by heat passing through the wall from the broadcast transmitters
in the next room. In extreme conditions, an AC heater in the room will provide additional heat to
keep the room above about 55 degrees.

 

Command: UHF #1 (N8DNX) SQ (Squelch) Low Status
Codes to execute: 96
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
Enter this command to report the status of the “Squelch Low” control line to the N8DNX repeater.
When “Squelch Low” is on, the squelch on the repeater is set to be slightly more sensitive.
When “Squelch Low” is off, the squelch on the repeater is set a bit tighter-which can be helpful
for eliminating low-level interference.

 

Command: UHF Preamp Current
Codes to execute: 98
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
This command reports the DC supply current to the tower-mounted UHF preamplifier. A normal value
is approximately 220 ma. Any value significantly different from that may indicate a problem with
the UHF preamplifier.


Note: The UHF preamplifier is actually a redundant pair of individual preamplifier stages.
Either of the two preamplifier circuits can fail and the system will continue to function, although
with a slightly worse system noise figure and about 3 db less gain. The failure of one of these
two redundant pairs may cause a decrease or increase in the current reported by this command.

 

Command: On-Line help for Test and Diagnostic Commands
Codes to execute: 99
User Level Required: 0 – All Users
Description:
This command plays a brief polite voice message describing the system status functions.

 



 



IRLP – Internet Radio Linking Project



The “Internet Radio Linking Project” (IRLP) is a cooperative project to link distant Amateur Radio stations and
repeaters (nodes) over the Internet. IRLP permits the operator at one node to select, and connect to, any other
available distant node by entering specific commands. Once connected, radio users within range of either connected
node can enter into a QSO as if they are all using the same local repeater. IRLP nodes are located all over the
world and as such provide an opportunity for DX, of sorts, for local users. Currently, there are more than 275 nodes,
many in North America, but a number scattered across the world.


Note: You do not need a higher-class license to use the IRLP system. If your license permits you to use a
repeater, then you are permitted to use IRLP.


A status page with a list of nodes and status of each is available over the Internet at http://status.irlp.net.


A four-digit number designates each node. The on-line status page lists the node number, call letters, location,
last status update and present status of each node. The preset status will be one of the following values.







DOWN Node is currently out of operation or unreachable
IDLE Node is operational and available for a connection
REF# Node is connected to an IRLP reflector. Connect to that reflector
to contact users of the node.
{anything else} The call sign or name of another node to which it is connected-the
node is unavailable.


Reflectors are central servers that permit more than 2 IRLP nodes to connect to each other at one time. These
reflectors permit a “round table” of sorts between users of 2 or more nodes. You may connect to a reflector just
as you would to any specific node. The only difference is that you never know where you may reach or whom you may contact!


You connect to a remote node or reflector by entering a command prefix (38) followed by the number of the node. To disconnect
from any IRLP node, use “38 73”.





38 {nnn} Connect to node number {nnn}
38 73 Disconnect from any node

When you connect to a distant IRLP node, you will hear a message indicating that you are connected to their node.
Similarly, when you connect to the distant node, that node will transmit a message indicating which node has connected to
it. Below are examples for connecting to, and disconnecting from, WB8NXP’s IRLP node on his repeater in Southfield MI.





38 4460 Connect to node 446 in Southfield (talk to stations in Southfield)
38 73 Disconnect from node 446 in Southfield


Users of other IRLP nodes may also connect to our IRLP node. If any call from another node comes in while IRLP is not
connected to one of the repeaters, the IRLP system will automatically connect to the W8GQN VHF repeater and the incomming call
will be heard there.


Note: The following are special commands to the IRLP node. These commands are unique to the IRLP node on our system and
will not function on other IRLP nodes. These do not connect to other IRLP nodes. Instead they perform functions local to
the IRLP computer, such as playing an ARRL News recording.












38 73 Stop playing recorded audio news
38 0001 Play the most recent ARRL Audio News Bulletin (Updated late Saturday night)
38 0002 Play the most recent Amateur Radio Newsline (Updated late Saturday night)
38 0003 Play the most recent This Week in Amateur Radio (Updated early Sunday morning)
38 0101 Play Pelston Airport weather (Updated hourly – on the hour)
38 0102 Play statistics report from most receint IRLP connection
38 0103 Play Propagation report (Updated hourly – :05 after the hour)
38 0104 Play list of nearby APRS stations
38 0199 Play a silly message


Operation on the IRLP network is very similar to operation on the local repeater, with a few exceptions.



General IRLP node use guidelines:



  • Be considerate and patient with other IRLP users. There are new IRLP nodes being added all the time and inexperienced users trying the system every day-try to make them welcome. Remember, you are Northern Michigan’s “ambassadors” to the world.
  • Do not tie up the W8GQN SAARC club repeater for extended times with IRLP operation during peak use hours for the repeater. The KO8P repeater is preferred for long-term remote base and IRLP operations.
  • Assist traveling Hams with use of the IRLP system. If they’ve used IRLP elsewhere, they may be familiar with needing a prefix before the IRLP Node nuimber. There is no problem with informing them on how to use our IRLP Node.

When connected to another IRLP node:

  • Wait 10-15 seconds after connecting to a distant IRLP node to account for transmission of the voice message on the distant IRLP node.
  • Allow an extra second or two between transmissions to account for network delays.
  • Include your city and state when you ID. Users of the distant IRLP node may not know you are not a local user.
  • Immediately after connecting to a distant IRLP node, identify with your call, city and state.
  • Identify and state that you are disconnecting before disconnecting from a distant IRLP node.

When connected to an IRLP Reflector (in addition to the above):

  • Always permit extra time between transmissions to account for network delays and for other stations to join or leave a discussion. (Some nodes cannot disconnect when someone is talking.)
  • Identify before sending any DTMF commands, such as to disconnect from a node.
  • Hold your microphone PTT for about 1 second before talking to allow for network delays.
  • To break into a QSO, state your call sign once during a pause in traffic.
  • Don’t break into a QSO simply to “work” one of the stations. Do break into a QSO to join a conversation.
  • When more than 2 people are in a QSO on a reflector, try to maintain an organized “round table” format.
  • Do not start a “Net” on a reflector without the permission of the reflector owner.
  • If you are experiencing interference to the local repeater, disconnect from the reflector to avoid interfering with other user’s transmissions.
  • Keep in mind that there may at times be many users on the same reflector. Always be courteous and patient!

For a detailed description of IRLP, additional operating guidelines, and how you can participate, go to
http://www.irlp.net.


 


User Command Reference

User Levels: 0 = Public user, 1 = Club member




























































Command Function Min User Level
*00 VHF Repeater PL By-Pass for 15 Minutes 0
 
* {phone#} Dial {phone#} on autopatch 0
# Hang up autopatch 0
 
19 Help with Autopatch commands 0
 
20 Check for public mail – Announces who mail is for. 0
21 {message#} Retrieve public mail message. 0
22 Erase the public mail message just retrieved

(May only be used after command 21.)
0
23 Record a public mail message 0
24 {user #} Retrieve private mail 1
25 Erase private mail 1
26 {user #} Record private mail for {user#} 1
27 Play club bulletins 0
270 Play expanded club bulletin 0
28 Play N8DNX repeater bulletins 0
280 Play expanded N8DNX bulletin 0
29 Help with message commands 0
 
30 Intra-system linking off 1
31 Monitor W8GQN repeater from current repeater 1
32 Link to W8GQN repeater from current repeater 1
33 Monitor N8DNX repeater from current repeater 1
34 Link to N8DNX repeater from current repeater 1
35 Monitor KO8P repeater from current repeater 1
36 Link to KO8P repeater from current repeater 1
38 {node#} Connect to IRLP node {node#} 0
38 73 Disconnect or stop playing audio news program 0
38 0001 Play ARRL Audio News (must be linked to IRLP) 0
38 0002 Play Amateur Radio Newsline (must be linked to IRLP) 0
38 0003 Play This Week in Amateur Radio (must be linked to IRLP) 0
38 0101 Play Pelston Airport Weather (must be linked to IRLP) 0
38 0102 Play stats on last IRLP connection (must be linked to IRLP) 0
38 0103 Play Propagation report (must be linked to IRLP) 0
38 0104 Play list of nearby APRS stations (must be linked to IRLP) 0
38 0199 Play a silly message (must be linked to IRLP) 0
39 Help with intra-system linking Messages 0
 
40 Link Off 0
41 Toggle link Transmit On/Off 0
400 Link to 146.74 repeater (from current repeater) 1
401 Link to IRLP (from current repeater) 1
410 Link to 29.6 FM (from current repeater) 1
49 Help with inter-system linking commands 0
 
50 External linking / Remote Base off 1
51 Enter remote base mode (UHF repeater only per Part 97) 1
52 Toggle TX/RX for current link (pending) 1
500 Link to 146.740 repeater (pending) ??????? 1
59 Help with remote base commands 0
 
60 Listen to weather radio – 2 minutes 0
61 Stop listening to weather radio 0
62 Replay last recorder weather alert 0
63 Outside temperature (pending) 0
64 Wind speed (pending) 0
69 Help with weather related commands 0
 
70 List who is currently logged in 0
71 {user#} {pass} Log into system as user {user#} with passcode {pass} 0
72 Log out of system 1
79 Help with user access commands 0
 
80 {digits} Touch tone pad test – repeat {digits} 0
81 Audio test – replay next transmission

Enter command 81, wait for the courtesy tone, key up and speak
0
89 Help with test commands 0
 
90 Total system status report 0
91 Backup battery current 0
92 Backup battery voltage 0
93 DC supply voltage 0
94 Date and Time
95 Room Temperature 0
97 Report received signal strength – (UHF Repeaters Only)

Reported in dbm.
0
98 UHF receive preamp current (should be about 220ma). 0
99 Help with system status commands 0
 
999 System information and help overview 0


 



Remote Base User’s Manual



The remote base system is capable of receiving from .1 to 30 MHz, transmitting on the HF Ham bands, and receiving and
transmitting on the 50 MHz, 144 MHz, 220 MHz, and 440 MHz Ham bands using LSB, USB, AM, and FM modes. There is also
a CW mode, but as there is no way to remotely key the transmitter, it’s of little practical use other than receiving.


Note: There may be transmitting limitations due to the antennas connected to the remote base. As of this time,
the HF transmit antenna is only useable on 20 Meters and above and there is not yet a 50 MHz antenna on the system.
Expanded antenna systems are in the works and will be installed in the Spring of 2002. Please contact N8DNX for current
information.


Operation of the remote base system will seem daunting at first, but you’ll soon find that commonly used functions will
be easy to remember and start to make sense. It’s however suggested that you cut out the “Remote Base Quick Reference
Guide” and have it available whenever operating the remote base.


The Remote Base and the Law



According to 97.3 (38) of the FCC rules, operation of the Remote Base is considered “Remote Control” of an amateur radio
station. A remotely controlled station must be controlled using certain frequencies above 220 MHz. As such, operation
of the Remote Base system is not permitted on the W8GQN VHF repeater. Remote base operation is therefore only permitted
on the N8DNX UHF repeaters.


A station operating under remote control may not be “automatically controlled”. When you use the remote base system,
you are the control operator of that remotely controlled station. As such, you should identify the remote base using your
own call letters. The proper way to identify would be “This is {your call} remote base”. If you wish to be more precise,
you may identify with “This is {your call} operating the N8DNX remote base”. Please follow all requirements for
identification when operating the remote base system.


Since you are the control operator when you operate the remote base system, you are fully responsible for its operation.
Do not leave the remote base system enabled when you are not available to monitor or control its operation.


You may allow others users on the repeater to operate through the remote base while you are in control, even if their
license class does not permit them to operate on the frequency or mode you have set. This is analogous to permitting
someone else to talk into the microphone of your home station while you are at the controls. You are, however, fully
responsible for their use of the remote base and you must properly identify the remote base operation with your call letters
as mentioned above.


Turning on the Remote Base System



You will need to log into the system before turning on the remote base system. Your user ID is assigned according to your
license class. When you log into the system with your ID and Pass Code, the system will know what license class you have
and will limit the frequencies on which you can transmit accordingly. Once you’re logged in, enter command code 50 to turn
on the remote base. You cannot enter commands to the remote base system if you are not logged in!


When you turn on the remote base system, you will only be able to enter commands to the remote base system and will not
be able to use the set of normal control codes. To enter normal control codes, you must first turn off the remote base.



Remote Base Command Codes



All remote base commands begin with a “7”. This access digit prevents accidentally entering a short, single digit, command.
The next digits of the command designate specific function and any additional digits that need to be specified.


You will note that there is some logic to how these commands are laid out on a normal Touch Tone pad. For example,
all of the commands to bump the frequency down are located on the left column while all of the commands to bump the
frequency up are located on the right column (with the exception of “7 A” and “7 B”, isn’t there always an exception).
As you learn these commands, think more about their location on the keypad and less about the actual command numbers and
you may find them easier to remember.















































































































Command: Receive Only
Codes to execute: 7 1
Description:
Use this command to switch the remote base from receive/transmit to receive only mode.
(Transmitting into the repeater will not cause the remote base to transmit.) The remote base
will always start in receive only mode, so this command is not necessary to begin receiving
after turning on the remote base system.

 

Command: Set Radio Mode
Codes to execute: 7 1 {mode}
Description:
This command sets the mode of operation for the radio.


Where {mode} is: 1 = USB, 2 = LSB, 3 = AM, 4 = FM, 5 = CW

 

Command: Receive/Transmit
Codes to execute: 7 2
Description:
This command places the remote base in receive/transmit mode. When in receive/transmit mode,
transmitting into the repeater will cause the remote base to transmit. To return to receive
only mode, use command 7 1.


Note: You can only select frequencies on which you are allowed to transmit when in
receive/transmit mode.

 

Command: Toggle PL Receive
Codes to execute: 7 2 1
Description:
This command toggles PL receive on and off. When this PL receive mode is selected, the
receiver squelch will not open unless the correct PL tone is being received.


Note: This will only work on the 50 MHz, 144 MHz, 220 MHz and 440 MHz bands when in
FM mode and with PL transmit enabled (7 2 2).

 

Command: Toggle PL Transmit
Codes to execute: 7 2 2
Description:
This command toggles PL transmit on and off. When PL transmit mode is selected, the remote
base will transmit the selected PL tone.


Note: This will only work on the 50 MHz, 144 MHz, 220 MHz and 440 MHz bands when in FM mode.

 

Command: Turn Off PL Receive and Transmit
Codes to execute: 7 2 3
Description:
This command turns off both receive and transmit PL modes.

 

Command: Announce Receive and Transmit PL Settings
Codes to execute: 7 2 8
Description:
When you enter this command, the remote base system will announce the current PL receive and
transmit settings.

 

Command: Set PL Frequency
Codes to execute: 7 2 {Hz}
Description:
This command sets the PL frequency. The value {Hz} is the four digits of the PL frequency.
For example “7 2 1072” will set the PL frequency to 107.2 Hz. Only standard PL tone frequencies may be used.


Note: DO NOT include a “*” for decimal point as is the case when setting the radio frequency.

 

Command: Turn Off the Remote Base System
Codes to execute: 7 3
Description:
Enter this command to turn off and exit the remote base system. This will return to you normal
repeater operation and the normal set of repeater control commands. The remote base will not
transmit when off, so there is no need to turn off receive/transmit mode (using 7 1) prior to
turning off the remote base system.

 

Command: Bump Frequency Down 100 Hz
Codes to execute: 7 4
Description:
Entering this command will change the current VFO setting down 100 Hz. Use this command to make
small adjustments to the remote base frequency. If you are in receive/transmit mode, you will
not be allowed to go beyond the edge of the permitted transmit frequency range on the current band.

 

Command: Select VFO “A”
Codes to execute: 7 5
Description:
This command selects VFO “A”. The remote base system has two VFO’s “A” and “B”. Switching VFOs
will restore the remote base to the frequency and mode it was on when that VFO was last used.


Note: The remote base system uses separate radios for HF and VHF/UHF operation. When
switching VFO’s results in the remote base having to switch radios, the system will automatically
turn off the remote base, reconfigure it for the correct radio, and ask you to turn it back on.
(For reasons beyond the scope of this document, it was not possible to make this process fully automatic.)

 

Command: Recall Memory
Codes to execute: 7 5 {memory #} (Memory numbers 1 or 2 digits 0 through 99)
Description:
Use this command to recall the contents of the specified memory into the current VFO and set
the frequency, mode, offset and other data that was stored in that memory.

 

Command: Bump Frequency Up 100 Hz
Codes to execute: 7 6
Description:
Entering this command will change the current VFO setting up 100 Hz. Use this command to make
small adjustments to the remote base frequency.

 

Command: Bump Frequency Up 100 Hz
Codes to execute: 7 6
Description:
Entering this command will change the current VFO setting up 100 Hz. Use this command to make
small adjustments to the remote base frequency. If you are in receive/transmit mode, you will not be
allowed to go beyond the edge of the permitted transmit frequency range on the current band.

 

Command: Bump Frequency Down 500 Hz
Codes to execute: 7 7
Description:
Entering this command will change the current VFO setting down 500 Hz. Use this command to make
small adjustments to the remote base frequency. If you are in receive/transmit mode, you will
not be allowed to go beyond the edge of the permitted transmit frequency range on the current band.

 

Command: Scan Up or Down in Frequency
Codes to execute: 7 7 {speed}
Description:
Entering this command with the desired speed will cause the remote base to scan up or
down at various speeds. The remote base will continue to scan, stopping periodically to
announce the frequency. You can stop scanning by transmitting briefly into the repeater.


Where {speed} is:





1 = Down Slow 3 = Up Slow
4 = Down Medium 6 = Up Medium
7 = Down Fast 9 = Up Fast

 

Command: Announce Current Settings
Codes to execute: 7 8
Description:
This command causes the remote base to announce the current frequency, offset (if not zero),
and the selected VFO.

 

Command: Turn Off Transmit Offset
Codes to execute: 7 8 0
Description:
This command will turn off any current transmit offset setting (such as a repeater offset).
After entering this command, the remote base will transmit on the same frequency as it receives.

 

Command: Turn On Transmit Offset
Codes to execute: 7 8 1
Description:
This command will turn on transmit off set and use the offset frequency that was last set.
After entering this command, the remote base will transmit on a frequency that is different
from the receive frequency by the amount of the frequency offset set with command “7 8 1 x x”.

 

Command: Turn On Transmit Offset and Set Offset Direction
Codes to execute: 7 8 1 {direction}
Description:
This command is similar to “7 8 1” except that it specifies the offset direction, either
plus or minus, from the receive frequency.


Where {direction} is: 0 = Positive Offset, 1 = Negative Offset

 

Command: Turn On Transmit Offset and Set Direction and Size
Codes to execute: 7 8 1 {direction} {size}
Description:
Entering this command will change the current VFO setting down 100 Hz. Use this command
to make small adjustments to the remote base frequency. If you are in receive/transmit mode,
you will not be allowed to go beyond the edge of the permitted transmit frequency range on the current band.


Where {size} is:







0 = 0 KHz 5 = 1.6 MHz
1 = 100 KHz 6 = 1.7 MHz
2 = 500 KHz 7 = 5 MHz
3 = 600 KHz 8 = 12 MHz
4 = 1 MHz 9 = 20 MHz

 

Command: Bump Frequency Up 500 Hz
Codes to execute: 7 9
Description:
Entering this command will change the current VFO setting up 500 Hz. Use this command to
make small adjustments to the remote base frequency. If you are in receive/transmit mode,
you will not be allowed to go beyond the edge of the permitted transmit frequency range
on the current band.

 

Command: Select VFO “B”
Codes to execute: 7 0
Description:
This command selects VFO “B”. The remote base system has two VFO’s “A” and “B”.
Switching VFOs will restore the remote base to the frequency and mode it was on when
that VFO was last used.


Note: The remote base system uses separate radios for HF and VHF/UHF operation.
When switching VFO’s results in the remote base having to switch radios, the
system will automatically turn off the remote base, reconfigure it for the correct
radio, and ask you to turn it back on. (For reasons beyond the scope of this document,
it was not possible to make this process fully automatic.)

 

Command: Write Memory
Codes to execute: 7 5 {memory #} (Memory numbers are 1 or 2 digit 0 through 99)
Description:
Use this command to write the contents of the specified memory into the current VFO
and set the frequency, mode, offset and other data that was stored in that memory.

 

Command: Bump Frequency Up 20 Hz
Codes to execute: 7 A
Description:
Entering this command will change the current VFO setting up 20 Hz. Use this
command to make small adjustments to the remote base frequency. If you are in
receive/transmit mode, you will not be allowed to go beyond the edge of the
permitted transmit frequency range on the current band.

 

Command: Bump Frequency Down 20 Hz
Codes to execute: 7 B
Description:
Entering this command will change the current VFO setting down 20 Hz. Use this
command to make small adjustments to the remote base frequency. If you are in
receive/transmit mode, you will not be allowed to go beyond the edge of the permitted
transmit frequency range on the current band.

 

Command: Enter Frequency
Codes to execute: 7 {frequency}
Description:
Use this command to set the frequency of the remote base. Use the “*” key to specify
the decimal point between MHz and KHz. If you do not use the “*” key, it will not be
interpreted as a frequency.


Where {frequency} is: MHz followed by “*” followed by KHz


Examples:





7 14*292 14.292 MHz
7 146*68 146.680 MHz
7 0*100 100 KHz (Loran)


Note: The remote base system uses separate radios for HF and VHF/UHF operation.
When the frequency change results in the remote base having to switch radios, the
system will automatically turn off the remote base, reconfigure it for the correct
radio, and ask you to turn it back on. (For reasons beyond the scope of this document,
it was not possible to make this process fully automatic.)


Note: If the remote base is in receive/transmit mode, it will not permit you to
select a frequency on which you are not permitted to transmit. To select such a frequency,
use “7 1” to return to receive only mode, then select the desired frequency.

 



 


Remote Base Quick Reference Guide



The following guide is a quick reference for Remote Base commands. It is arranged to be similar to the
layout of a normal Touch Tone keypad. This reference chart should make sense if you are familiar with the
Remote Base commands listed above. Please use this only as a quick reference, and not as a guide to
Remote Base operation.

















71 RX Only
71 {Mode} HF Mode

(Mode = 1 USB, 2 LSB, 3 AM, 4 FM, 5 CW)
771 Scan Down Slow









72 RX and TX
72 {Hz} Set PL Frequency
721 RX PL On/Off
722 TX PL On/Off
723 PL Off
728 Recall PL





73 Exit HF Mode
773 Scan Up Slow




7A Bump Up 20 Hz






74 Bump Down 100Hz
74 {cmd} Execute Command
774 Scan Down Medium





75 Select VFO A
75 {mem} Recall Memory





76 Bump Up 100 Hz
776 Scan Up Medium




7B Bump Down 20 Hz





77 Bump Down 500 Hz
777 Scan Down Fast











78 Recall Current VFO
780 TX Offset Off
781 TX Offset On
781{x} [{y}] TX Offset Setting

(x = 0 Plus, 1 Minus)
0 = 0 KHz 1 = 100 KHz
2 = 500 KHz3 = 600 KHz
4 = 1 MHz 5 = 1.6 MHz
6 = 1.7 MHz7 = 5 MHz
8 = 12 MHz 9 = 20 MHz




79 Bump Up 500 Hz


 



* Use as decimal point





70 Recall VFO B
70 {mem} Write Memory




# Force Execution


 

Please read!

This site uses temporary "Cookies" to store limited information that's required to provide you with a consistent user experience. We don't store personally identifying or other sensitive information in these Cookies and these Cookies are erased when you close your Web Browser unless otherwise stated when you click "Show more".

If you're on a public computer, be sure to close all Web Browsers when you're done!

Show more Got it!